Staff

Professor Rosalind Smith

Professor Rosalind Smith

Researcher profile

Rosalind Smith is Chair of the Discipline of English and Director of the Centre for Early Modern Studies at the Australian National University, and is co-convenor of the Early Modern Women Research Network (EMWRN). She works on gender, form, politics, and history in early modern women’s writing, with particular interests in the ways in which women’s writing is produced, circulated, and received. She is the author of Sonnets and the English Woman Writer, 1560-1621: The Politics of Absence (2005), co-editor of the collections Material Cultures of Early Modern Women’s Writing (2014) and Early Modern Women and Complaint: Gender, Form, Politics (2020), and general editor with Patricia Pender of the Palgrave Encyclopedia of Early Modern Women’s Writing (forthcoming). As an Australian Research Council Future Fellow, her current research project is on early modern women’s marginalia, partnering with the University of Oxford and the Folger Shakespeare Library. She has led two ARC Discovery Projects on the Material Cultures of Early Modern Women’s Writing and Early Modern Women and the Poetry of Complaint, both involving large international teams and a mix of digital and traditional publication outcomes. She is currently the lead investigator of an ARC Linkage Project collaborating with State Library Victoria on the Emmerson Collection, Australia’s first early modern archive of scale, that seeks to understand and contextualise this bequest of over 5000 early modern books as well as provide digital pathways for scholarly and public engagement with the collection.

Dr Josh Brown

Dr Josh Brown

Researcher profile

Josh Brown is Senior Lecturer and Convenor of Italian Studies at ANU. After completing his PhD in history of the Italian language, he held a two-year position as Cassamarca Assistant Professor in Italian at The University of Western Australia. His first book looks at questions of language contact in non-literary texts sent from Milan in the late fourteenth century. A second co-authored book provides a study of the nearly 200 extant letters held in the New Norcia Archive and written by an Italian priest in colonial Western Australia. In addition to the history of the Italian language, his research interests have widened to include broader questions of dialect contact, language change, and koineization using tools from digital humanities. He is an affiliate of the ARC Centre of Excellence for the Dynamics of Language and the Centre for Digital Humanities Research, and is stream leader for historical sociolinguistics at ANU’s Centre for Research on Language Change. From 2016-17, he was a postdoctoral fellow in Italian Studies at Romanska och klassiska institutionen, Stockholm University, Sweden. His interdisciplinary research approach has examined questions of language contact in the history of Italian and his current research is on the historical formation of ‘common’ or koine languages, and their interaction with standard languages. He is currently writing a volume which investigates these dynamics in the letters of Margherita Lambertenghi, a nun from Milan. A second project aims to provide a comprehensive source of data for forms of language termed the “Mediterranean Lingua Franca” in early modern Italy.

Dr Gemma Betros

Dr Gemma Betros

Researcher profile

Gemma Betros completed a Bachelor of Arts in French and History (Hons) at the University of Queensland and an M.Phil and PhD in History at the University of Cambridge (Peterhouse). She has held academic posts at the University of Leeds, the Harvard Divinity School, and ANU, where she was awarded the 2016 Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Excellence in Education. Recent awards include a Mother Theodore Guerin Research Travel Grant from the Cushwa Center (University of Notre Dame, USA) and a mentorship from the Australian Society of Authors. Gemma’s research explores the long early modern period and into the nineteenth century in France, with a focus on religion and society, politics, gender, and sexuality across a number of textual forms, including diaries, letter-writing, theatre, and translation.

Dr Christina Clarke

Dr Christina Clarke

Researcher profile

Christina Clarke is Lecturer in Early Modern Art, Design, and Material Culture at the ANU Centre for Art History and Art Theory where she teaches the history of art and design from the early modern period to the present. Prior to becoming an art historian, Christina was a practicing metalsmith with a background in Classical studies. She completed her PhD in 2012 on Bronze Age Aegean metalwork. Her research focuses particularly on historical metal material culture and the history of metallurgy. In her current research she is investigating the network of artisans who produced Louis XIV’s famous silver furniture (melted down in 1669) and the chaîne opératoire of their production through archival documentation, graphic representations of the pieces, and related material culture. In 2018, Christina received an Endeavour Research Fellowship to undertake research for this project at the Voltaire Foundation at the University of Oxford. She is also an editor of a new digital critical edition of Jean-Benjamin de Laborde’s 1773 illustrated songbook Choix de chansons and Project Administrator for the ARC Discovery Project Performing Transdisciplinarity, which funded the creation of the edition. Her first monograph, The Manufacture of Minoan Metal Vessels: Theory and Practice, was published in 2013 by Astrom Editions.

Dr Tania M. Colwell 

Dr Tania M. Colwell 

Researcher profile

Tania M. Colwell is a Lecturer in History at ANU where she specialises in the cultural history of late medieval and early modern Europe. Tania’s research explores the ways in which cultural production, especially French manuscript and early book culture, contributed to the formation of identities and alterities throughout this period. In particular, she’s interested in how representations of the materiality and interiority of both lived and imagined experiences open up broader social, political, and philosophical questions within and across communities, time, and place. Her research draws on a range of interdisciplinary approaches from the fields of book and art history, the history of emotions, as well as gender, literary, and reception studies. She explores various issues and themes including friendship, conduct and governance, crusading, intercultural encounters, the marvellous and monstrous, and patronage. Tania’s research has received funding from national and international organisations, including the British Academy, the Australian Academy of the Humanities, the ARC Centre of Excellence for the History of Emotions, and the Society for the Study of Medieval Languages and Literature (UK). In addition to publishing articles and chapters in a range of international journals and collections, including the Journal of Medieval History, The Library, and the Journal of the Early Book Society, her recent publications include Women and Work in Premodern Europe: Experiences, Relationships and Cultural Representation, a collection of essays co-edited with Merridee L. Bailey and Julie Hotchin (2018), and an article on intercultural princely friendship in Emotions: History, Culture, Society (2020). As well as lecturing at ANU, Tania has also worked in academic publishing and in public history with l’Historiale de la Vendée, the Department of the Senate, the National Museum of Australia, and the National Trust (UK).

Dr Alexander Cook

Dr Alexander Cook

Researcher profile

Alexander Cook is a cultural and intellectual historian whose research focuses largely on France, Britain, and their empires in the eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. A Lecturer in the School of History at ANU, he is particularly interested in the social history of ideas. Much of his research studies the intersection between scientific, religious, and political thought during the Enlightenment and the Age of Revolution. He has published on issues such as the uses of history, anthropology, and travel literature in Revolutionary political thought, and the broader intersection between geopolitics and political philosophy. His most recent publication is “Practices of Reenactment,” in The Routledge Handbook of Reenactment Studies: Key Terms in the Field, edited by Vanessa Agnew, Jonathan Lamb, and Juliane Tomann (2020). He has also published on the history of pleasure, on sensibility, and on contemporary uses of history in the public realm – including in modern media. He is a former co-editor of History Australia, the journal of the Australian Historical Association, and a past President of the George Rude Society, the Australian Association for French Historical Studies.

Dr Ailén Cruz

Dr Ailén Cruz

Researcher profile

Ailén Cruz is Lecturer in the Spanish program, School of Literatures, Languages and Linguistics, ANU. She received her M.A. and Ph.D. degrees from the Department of Spanish and Portuguese at the University of Toronto (2015;2020). She completed a post-doctoral research fellowship at Mount Allison University’s Centre for Early Modern Visual Culture (2020), creating the interface and metadata for the CAIRN Repository (www.cemvc.ca): a database to encourage researchers to re-visit the western visual canon and investigate voices historically marginalized due to factors like race and gender.  She analyzed the significance of more traditional book illustrations, ranging from works like Don Quijote and El Cid to European depictions of American Indigenous populations. She also supervised the production of metadata for the database containing over 20,000 early modern book illustrations, ensuring metadata accuracy, database searchability, and the de-colonization of language. Currently, she is researching the implications of traditionally marginalized groups (i.e., women, indigenous peoples) taking up the bestiary, traditionally reserved for Christian, European purposes. This investigation hinges upon an original corpus of over eighty bestiaries curated through research trips to Argentina, Mexico, and Spain (https://www.bestiassueltas.net/ ). Beyond these projects, she is interested in ecocritical and bioethical discourse, as well as ontological perspectives on human/animal interaction. Her study of the bestiary genre and its centuries-long trajectory (from 200 A.D. onwards!) has led to broad interests, ranging from medieval narrative frameworks to Golden Age poetry to contemporary subversion of Latin American classics, although she most enjoys the Latin American avant-garde and Boom periods.

 

Dr Mark S Dawson

Dr Mark S Dawson

Researcher profile

Mark Dawson is a Senior Lecturer in History at the ANU. He was born in Christchurch (Aotearoa/New Zealand) toward the end of last century. Completing undergraduate and postgraduate degrees at the University of Auckland, he was awarded a Prince of Wales Cambridge Commonwealth Trust Scholarship for doctoral study in the UK. He was a student at Cambridge’s youngest college, Wolfson, and spent three hectic years dividing his time between the History and English faculties working on the dramatic representation of elite social status – gentility – in seventeenth-century Britain. He was awarded the History Faculty’s Members’ prize for work on that famous early modern Cantabrigian, Samuel Pepys. By the time he joined ANU, the early modern Atlantic world had joined Tudor–Stuart Britain in Mark’s teaching portfolio. More recently, Mark has taught courses on the history of racism over the “longue durée.” He was awarded the inaugural RSSS-HRC monograph writing fellowship in 2017, which resulted in Bodies Complexioned: Human Variation and Racism in Early Modern English Culture, c. 1600–1750 (Manchester University Press, 2019).

Dr Kate Flaherty 

Dr Kate Flaherty 

Researcher profile

Kate Flaherty is a Senior Lecturer in English and Drama in the School of Literature, Languages, and Linguistics at ANU. Kate’s research focuses on how Shakespeare’s works play on the stage of public culture. Her monograph Ours as We Play it: Australia Plays Shakespeare (UWAP, 2011) examined three plays in performance in contemporary Australia. More recent scholarship investigates Shakespeare performance in the 19th century and its public interplay with education, gender politics, imperialism, and sectarian friction. Among the venues that have published her work are Contemporary Theatre Review, Australian Studies, Shakespeare Survey, and New Theatre Quarterly. She has also contributed to collections published by CUP, Routledge, Palgrave, and Arden Shakespeare. Her current monograph project is Moving Women: Touring Actresses and the Politics of Modernity. Kate is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy and 2019 winner of the ANU Vice’s Chancellor’s Award for Excellence in Education.

Dr Katrina Grant

Dr Katrina Grant

Researcher profile

Katrina Grant is an art historian with a background in the study of early modern Italy. Her research focuses on gardens and the history of landscapes, as well as the visual culture of theatre and festivals, and the connections between these two areas. Current research projects include “Digital Cartographies of the Roman Campagna,” with the British School at Rome. The project brings together historical maps with modern mapping technologies to recreate the lost landscape of the early modern Roman Campagna, and draws together data and research from a variety of disciplines, including art and architectural history, social history, cultural geography, and the history of climate and ecological change. Katrina has published on the gardens as a site for performance, history of emotions and set design, artistic relationships between Britain and Italy in the eighteenth century, the garden as a site for commemoration, and the use of landscape as a political stage for performances of courtly power. She is based within the ANU’s Centre for Digital Humanities Research and in this position she also looks at the role of digital technology in GLAM institutions, including an ongoing project with the NMA examining how small scale digital projects can be used to engage students with Australian history.

Professor Royston Gustavson

Professor Royston Gustavson

Researcher profile

Royston Gustavson is Dean, Academic Quality, ANU, and Professor, ANU Centre for Social Research and Methods. A passionate educator, in 2009 he received the ANU Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Teaching Excellence, from 2010-2011 was Associate Dean (Education) of the ANU College of Business and Economics, and from 2010-2012 served on ANU’s 15-person governing body, the ANU Council. From 2012 to 2019 he was Associate Dean (Education) in the ANU College of Arts and Social Sciences, with academic oversight of the College’s degree programs and courses, concurrently serving from 2017 to 2019 as Deputy Dean of the College. From January 2019 to April 2021 he was Interim Pro-Vice Chancellor (Education) and in April 2021 he was appointed the University’s inaugural Dean (Academic Quality). In addition to his extensive publications in the fields of corporate governance and business ethics, he continues to research and publish on early modern music printing and book history, most recently on ‘The Early Music Collection of the Bibliotheca aulica Salisburgensis: An Initial Investigation’, in the Journal of the Alamire Foundation, 12, no. 1 (2020), 11-49. His current research projects are (i) book-length studies on the publications of the sixteenth-century printers Hieronymus Formschneider, Christian Egenolff and Montanus & Neuber/Gerlach/Kauffmann and the reception of their books; and (ii) a study of sixteenth-century publishers’ and library catalogues and what they tell us about the music book trade and about lost music books.

Dr Janet Hadley Williams

Dr Janet Hadley Williams

Researcher profile

Janet Hadley Williams is Honorary Lecturer in English at ANU; Member of Council, The Scottish Text Society; Honorary Fellow of the Association for Scottish Literary Studies; member of The Scottish Medievalists; and Fellow, Society of Antiquaries of Scotland. She was assistant to William A. Ringler, Bibliography and Index of English Verse, 1476–1558 (1988); and bibliographer for “The Early Imprint Project: A Catalogue of Books Printed before 1801 in Australian Libraries and Public Collections” (NLA, 1986–88). She was Visiting Fellow at the Centre for the History of the Book, University of Edinburgh (1999); and President of the Sir David Lyndsay Society (2007–17). Her articles have appeared in Parergon, Journal of the Edinburgh Bibliographical Society, Studies in Scottish Literature, Script and Print, and elsewhere. She was a contributor to the National Library of Scotland’s “Chepman and Myllar Prints: Digitised Facsimiles,” gen. ed. S. Mapstone (2008). Her books include Stewart Style 1513–1542: Essays on the Court of James V, ed. (1996); Sir David Lyndsay: Selected Poems, ed. (2000); A Companion to Medieval Scottish Poetry, ed. with Priscilla Bawcutt (2006); ‘Fresche Fontanis’: Studies in the Culture of Medieval and Early Modern Scotland, ed. with J. Derrick McClure (2013); ‘Duncane Laideus Testament’ and Other Comic Poems in Older Scots, ed. (2016). At present she is editing the poems of William Stewart and John Bellenden for the Scottish Text Society.

 

Julie Hotchin

Julie Hotchin

Researcher profile

Julie Hotchin is currently an Honorary Lecturer in the School of History. She is an historian of Western Europe in the Middle Ages, with a particular focus on gender and religious life in Germany from the twelfth to fifteenth centuries. Her work explores women’s participation and cultural production in monastic reform movements, addressing questions of communal identities, gender, and authority, especially as they relate to interactions of religious women and men. She has interdisciplinary interests in the history of the book, especially women’s roles in manuscript production, use and exchange, the nature of religious materiality, and the role of emotions in religious experience.

Dr Jennifer Hendriks

Dr Jennifer Hendriks

Researcher profile

Jennifer Hendriks is a lecturer in the School of Literature, Languages, and Linguistics at ANU. In 2009 she was awarded both the CASS Award for Teaching Excellence and the ANU Vice’s Chancellor’s Award for Excellence in Education. She holds a Bachelor of Arts (Hons) from the University of California Davis with majors in International Relations and German. While on exchange at Georg August University of Göttingen, she developed an interest in early modern history and the German language, and subsequently went on to complete a Master of Applied Linguistics, a Master of German Philology, and a PhD in Germanic linguistics at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. As a doctoral candidate, she received a Fulbright Scholarship and was affiliated with the University of Utrecht while conducting archival research for her PhD thesis on immigration and language change in 16th/17th century Dutch. Jennifer’s interdisciplinary approach to historical linguistic research integrates social, demographic, and economic history with theoretical insights from modern sociology, sociolinguistics, and contact linguistics to examine the effects of migration on the linguistic repertoires and language use of individuals from the early modern Low Countries. The linguistic effects of massive migration on the emerging urban Dutch vernaculars are virtually undocumented and remain poorly understood. Her current monograph project aims to further our understanding of language and society during this turbulent and unstable period in Dutch history, thereby contributing to the larger goals of creating more inclusive linguistic histories and refining models used to examine past contexts of contact-induced change involving speakers of closely related language varieties.

Associate Professor Ian Higgins

Associate Professor Ian Higgins

Researcher profile

Ian Higgins is a Reader in English at ANU where he teaches courses on British and Irish Literature of the seventeenth, eighteenth, nineteenth, and twentieth centuries. He is a scholar of Jonathan Swift and of the Jacobite era (1688-1759). His principal research interests include the life and works of Jonathan Swift (1667-1745), the career and writings of the religious polemicist and Jacobite pamphleteer Charles Leslie (1650-1722), and pamphlets, pamphleteering, and confessional politics in the early modern period and the eighteenth century. He is a foundational general editor of The Cambridge Edition of the Works of Jonathan Swift (2008- in progress).

Dr karo moret-miranda 

Dr karo moret-miranda 

Researcher profile

karo moret-miranda is an Afro-Cuban historian, early research academic and lecturer in History at ANU, specialising in African Studies and African Diaspora Studies, focusing on race, religion, and gender issues. She is also interested in the influence and borrowings of African and Afro-Caribbean culture on Western thought and culture, and vice versa. karo now works on the change generated by the slave trade and slavery in accommodation of Gender and Religions in the Caribbean and Africa from an interdisciplinary perspective. The research that she carries out within medieval studies is focused on the performativity of the body, with special attention to the diversity of bodies, ethnicities, deformities, and monsters. She is interested in establishing conversations between text and image about the body, detecting the synesthesia between how the body is represented and how it is narrated/called/described. karo’s doctoral research received funding from the Agency for Management of University and Research Grants (AGAUR Barcelona, 2016-2019). She is the author of “Alter-i-dad(es)” in Humanidades en acción, a project directed by Marina Garcés (2019) and editor of Negra y Cubana tenías que ser (2021) and ¿Es fácil ser hombre y difícil ser negro? (2020), Wanafrica Ediciones. In addition to publishing articles and academic chapters and working on her thesis book, she continues to collaborate with European institutions and museums.

Dr Julie Robarts 

Dr Julie Robarts 

Researcher profile

Julie Robarts is a Research Officer in the School of Literature, Languages, and Linguistics, where she is research and administrative assistant for Rosalind Smith’s Future Fellowship project “Marginalia and the Early Modern Woman Writer,” and the Linkage Project “Transforming the Early Modern Archive: the Emmerson Collection at State Library Victoria.” She completed her MA (2009) and PhD in Italian Studies (2019), at the University of Melbourne. Her research on the Venetian Benedictine nun, Arcangela Tarabotti (1604-1652), and Roman virtuosa singer, Margherita Costa (fl. 1628-1654) explores the gender dynamics, and effects of print censorship within libertine literary and musical circles in counter-reformation Rome, Florence, and Venice, by combining material, formal, and intertextual methods of analysis of the prose (Tarabotti) and poetic works (Costa) of these authors. Her current projects include a monograph on Margherita Costa, Challenging Male Authored Poetry: Margherita Costa’s Marinist Lyrics 1638-39, for the University of Delaware Press, Early Modern Feminisms series, and an English translation of Galileo Galilei’s Mecaniche, for the first complete English critical edition of that work. In 2017 she received an ACIS Cassamarca Foundation Scholarship to fund two months research in Florence and Rome. In 2019/20 she received a Gladys Krieble Delmas Foundation Commonwealth grant for research in Venice, on a new project “Barbara Strozzi in the debates over the Unisoni, a philological and textual analysis,” that reappraises print and manuscript sources that underpin current narratives of Strozzi’s early career.

Dr Robert Wellington

Dr Robert Wellington

Researcher profile

Robert Wellington is Senior Lecturer, and ARC DECRA Fellow (2018-22) in the Centre for Art History and Art Theory at ANU. He is an art historian with a special interest in the role of material culture in history making and cross-cultural exchange. Prior to receiving a PhD in Art History from the University of Sydney, he had ten years experience in various roles in the contemporary arts sector. He is a member of the advisory panel to the Bloomsbury Academic book series, “The Material Culture of Art and Design.” His monograph, Antiquarianism and the visual histories of Louis XIV: Artifacts for a future past, was published by Ashgate in 2015, and is held in public and university libraries across the world. Robert is also engaged with digital methods for art historical research, and is lead CI on the ARC Discovery Project Performing Transdisciplinarity, a digital transdisciplinary study of an eighteenth century songbook in collaboration with colleagues from ANU, The University of Sydney, Oxford University, and Sorbonne University.