Higher Degree Research Candidates

Judi Crane

Judi Crane

Judi Crane is a  PhD candidate in English at the School of Literature, Languages, and Linguistics at ANU. The title of her thesis is “Performative aspects of Shakespeare’s Margaret of Anjou.” Her publications include “A View from the Stage,” ISSA Conference Proceedings (2013) and “Childbirth Privileges; denied, distorted and restored,” Renaissance Perspectives (2006). Judi is a retired teacher, actor, dramaturg, director, and theatre board member.

Scott W. Dempsey

Scott W. Dempsey

Candidate profile

Scott Dempsey is a PhD candidate in the School of History at ANU. The title of his thesis is “The Transfer of Empire from Britain to England: A Study in Medieval and Early Modern Historical Argument.” He has published two articles in the The Scottish Historical Review: “The Great Cause Tribunal as a Centumviral Court: Some New Evidence and Analysis,” 99:2 (2020) and “Reassessing the Terminological Discrepancies in the Records of the Great Cause,” 98:2 (2019), as well as a chapter in an edited collection, “The Evolution of Edward I’s ‘Historical’ Claim to Overlordship of Scotland, 1291-1301,” in Fourteenth Century England XI, edited by David Green and Chris Given-Wilson (Boydell & Brewer, 2019). His research interests include intellectual history, history of political thought, longue durée history, and history of international thought. In 2020 he was awarded the Royal Historical Society’s David Berry Prize.

Charbel El-Khaissi

Charbel El-Khaissi

Candidate site

Charbel El-Khaissi is a PhD candidate in the Linguistics at the School of Literatures, Languages, and Linguistics at ANU, with a research focus in historical linguistics. His thesis, “The Historical Syntax of Definiteness in Late Aramaic,” exploits technological advancements in Syriac computational linguistics and digital humanities to trace the evolution of Aramaic nominals across a 1,000 year period. Charbel is an industry consultant in artificial intelligence and Big Data spaces with over a decade of experience working for multinational technology giants, high-profile government clients, and not-for-profit organisations.

Fleur Goldthorpe

Fleur Goldthorpe

Candidate profile

Fleur Goldthorpe is a PhD candidate in the School of History at ANU. The title of her thesis is “British Women of the Portocracy: Port Wine Dinastias, Family, and Transcultural Lives, 1678–1855.” Prior to commencing her post-graduate research, Fleur worked for nearly a decade in the field of technology commercialisation, translating research outputs into new products and services. Her research interests include Anglo-Portuguese studies, Australian colonial history, international wine studies, migration and transculturalism, and gender history. In January 2018, Fleur was awarded the National Council of Women (NSW) Australian History Award in recognition of her research on women exhibitors of Australian colonial wine at international and intercolonial exhibitions of the nineteenth century.

Rhianne Grieve

Rhianne Grieve

Rhianne Grieve is a PhD candidate in the School of History at ANU. The title of her thesis is “The Concept of Harmony in the Early British Socialist Thought.” She holds a BA/LLB (Hons) from the University of Technology Sydney, and an MPhil in Political Thought and Intellectual History from the University of Cambridge.

Sarah Hodge

Sarah Hodge

Candidate profile

Sarah Hodge is a PhD candidate in the Centre for Art History and Art Theory, ANU. The title of her thesis is “A Fancy for the Past: Sartorial Historicism and Antiquarianism in Britain and France 1730-1870.” Her research centres upon British and French eighteenth-nineteenth century dress evoking history and historical themes in their design. She is interested in sartorial historicism and the idea of dressing out of time.

Thomas Lalevee

Thomas Lalevee

Candidate profile

Thomas Lalevee is a PhD candidate in the School of History at ANU. The title of his thesis is “From Perfectibility to Progress: The Search for a Science of Society in France, 1750-1850.” He has recently published a chapter on the project for a new encyclopedia by the early nineteenth-century thinker Henri Saint-Simon. He is interested in the history of social and political thought, of science, and of ideas more generally.

Lucy Matthews

Lucy Matthews

Lucy Matthews is a PhD candidate in English in the School of Literature, Languages, and Linguistics at ANU. She is a theatre maker with a keen interest in how theory and practice align. Her thesis “What’s mine is yours and what is yours is mine: Queer women adapting queer women, a PaR study of William Shakespeare’s Measure for Measure and John Lyly’s Gallathea,” examines the creative processes involved in adapting early modern theatre from a queer perspective utilising theatre devising techniques to engage and explore sixteenth-century representations of female-female desire.

Luisa Moore

Luisa Moore

Candidate profile

Luisa Moore is a PhD candidate in English at the School of Literature, Languages, and Linguistics at ANU. The title of her thesis is “Through the Artist’s Eye: John Austen’s Illustrated Hamlet.”

Kelly Peihopa

Kelly Peihopa

Kelly Peihopa is a PhD candidate in English and Writing at the University of Newcastle. The title of her thesis is “Anne Boleyn’s Prison Literature: Reception, Circulation, Attribution.” She graduated from the University of Newcastle with a Bachelor of Arts Distinction in 2016, with a double major in English and Writing and History. Her English honours thesis earned First Class Honours, the Faculty Medal, and the University Medal, and was subsequently published as “Reframing Feminine Modesty, Complaint, and Desire in the More Family” in Parergon 37.1 (2020). She also has published creative nonfiction articles on domestic violence in literary journals Meanjin (Spring 2018) and Sūdo Journal (January 2019). Kelly is a research assistant for the Early Modern Women Research Network (EMWRN) and the Gender Research Network (GRN) at the University of Newcastle, and is research and editorial assistant for the Palgrave Encyclopedia of Early Modern Women’s Writing (forthcoming), working with general editors Rosalind Smith and Patricia Pender. Her interests are early modern women’s writing, prison writing, poetry, domestic violence research, and creative nonfiction.

Emma Rayner

Emma Rayner

Emma Rayner is a PhD candidate in English at the School of Literature, Languages, and Linguistics, ANU. The title of her thesis is Gender, Civility, and Emotion in Seventeenth-Century Writing. She has published an article on poet Hester Pulter and dramatist John Webster in Studies in English Literature, 1500-1900, and has an entry on poetry and emotion forthcoming in the Palgrave Encyclopedia of Early Modern Women’s Writing. She holds a BA and MA in English Literature from Te Herenga Waka Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand, and comes to ANU from the University of Fribourg, Switzerland.

 

Julia Rodwell

Julia Rodwell

Candidate profile

Julia Rodwell is a PhD candidate in the School of Art and Design at ANU. She is also the Publishing Coordinator at the National Gallery of Victoria. Her PhD research sits within the ARC Linkage Project Transforming the Early Modern Archive: the Emmerson Collection at SLV. Her thesis title is “Digital Design for Cultural Collections: Digital Humanities, Art Curatorship, and Museology in the Emmerson Collection Online Exhibition Project.” She is interested in engaging audiences with art and history through publishing, the display of archival materials, and online exhibitions.

Barbara Taylor

Barbara Taylor

Barbara Taylor is a PhD candidate in English, within the School of Literature, Languages, and Linguistics at ANU. The title of her thesis is ‘”If this be magic, let it be an art”: the Performance and Materiality of Magic in Shakespearean Romance.’ She holds a BA (Hons) in English and Ancient History from the University of Sydney, and an MA in Shakespeare Studies from King’s College London.

Hannah Upton

Hannah Upton

Hannah Upton is a PhD candidate in English within the School of Literature, Languages, and Linguistics at ANU. The title of her thesis is “The politics of marginalia and the early modern female reader,” with a particular focus on early modern women’s marginalia in the British Library. After her BA in English, she completed her MA in Early Modern English Literature: Text and Transmission (2020), both at King’s College London. The title of her MA thesis was “The Countess of Pembroke’s Arcadia and Early Modern Female Readership.” Her research focuses on female readership practices and political marginalia in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. In 2021 she was awarded the position of HDR candidate on Professor Rosalind Smith’s ARC funded Future Fellowship Marginalia and the Early Modern Woman Writer, 1530-1660.