Projects

Browse or search details of the innovative Australian Research Council funded projects currently underway by members of the CEMS.

Travelling objects: Art and cultural diplomacy

The study of prints and medals commissioned to commemorate history, art and science during the reign of Louis XIV (1638-1715), offer an intriguing opportunity to reassess the cultural (and cross-cultural) value of the prints and medals in the early-modern period. Louis XIV’s prints and medals were distributed across the known world, throughout Europe and the East, to King Phra Narai of Siam (1633-1688), the Safavid Shah, Sultan Hussein of Persia (1668-1726), and the Chinese Kangxi Emperor (1654-1722). Mapping patterns of non-colonial cultural exchange between France, Britain, China and Persia during this period, this study will present a revised account 

People

  • Robert Wellington short bio [Link to Robert Wellington CEMS Profile]

Performing Transdisciplinarity

This is the first study to specifically address the unique transdisciplinary nature of eighteenth-century print culture, the quintessential example of which is the illustrated songbook. In order to recreate the inherent performativity of these complex cultural objects, new models of cross-disciplinary collaboration and multimedia dissemination were required. This project provides one such model of methodological innovation: the team explored the nexus of image, music, and text in an exemplary French songbook, reconceived as a multimedia digital interface for sharing and linking deep disciplinary knowledge and for the innovative recreation of the sounds, sensibilities, and social mores of late-eighteenth-century France.

People

  • Robert Wellington [PHOTO] short bio [Link to Robert Wellington CEMS Profile]

  • Christina Clarke [PHOTO] short bio [Link to Christina Clarke CEMS Profile]

The result is an interactive, multimedia, digital critical edition of Choix de Chansons by Jean-Benjamin de Laborde, 1773, produced in collaboration with colleagues from ANU, The University of Sydney, Oxford University, and the Sorbonne.

Marginalia and the Early Woman Writer (1530-1610) – Future Fellowship

This Project aims to provide an ambitious new literary history of how early modern women read and wrote in the margins of their books, uncovering new texts, practices, writers and readers across the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. Reading is a central mechanism through which the English Renaissance was instituted: a means by which the classical world reached the early modern subject and vernacular textual culture came to flourish. Evidence for how reading operated can be found in the traces readers left behind in their books, including marginal annotations. These annotations provide not only crucial evidence of reading practice, but also an overlooked source of extraordinary writing. A world of textual activity can be found here: marks, signatures, requests for remembrance, short lyrics, devotional meditations, letters and extended prose tracts teem in the margins of early modern books and manuscripts, in both scribal and print forms. The margin has emerged as one of the most significant new textual sites of the period, moving from the edges of scholarship to a place of central importance. However, most scholarship in this field still focuses on men’s use of marginalia, overlooking hundreds of instances of marginal annotation by women. This project will provide the first comprehensive examination of how early modern women readers engaged with the margins of their books. It will radically expand our conception of what constituted early modern women’s writing and how it was circulated. It will also re-evaluate, from a new perspective, our understanding of reading, writing and book use in early modern England and disseminate its findings in new digital forms, bringing together materialist and digital humanities scholarship to create a digital archive enabling future research. 

Ros

Ros

Jake Arthur is a DPhil candidate and Clarendon Scholar at Oxford University. His thesis examines early modern women’s work in translation and paraphrase and seeks to reclaim the expressive and intellectual possibilities of “derivative” works. The preliminary title of the thesis is “‘The stuffe not ours”: the work of derivation in women’s writing, 1560–c.1664.” In collaboration with Sarah C. E. Ross, he is co-editor of the poetry section of the forthcoming Palgrave Encyclopaedia of Early Modern Women’s Writing. With Rosalind Smith, he has co-authored a chapter in Early Modern Women and Complaint: Gender, Form, Politics (2020) which considers the implications of digital resources for the traditional first-line index in relation to a forthcoming database of early modern women’s complaint poetry. He works a researcher on the ARC funded project “Marginalia and the Early Modern Woman Writer,” and before that in the ARC-Marsden Grant funded project, “‘Woe is me:’ women and complaint in the English Renaissance.”

Jake Arthur

Jake Arthur

Jake Arthur is a DPhil candidate and Clarendon Scholar at Oxford University. His thesis examines early modern women’s work in translation and paraphrase and seeks to reclaim the expressive and intellectual possibilities of “derivative” works. The preliminary title of the thesis is “‘The stuffe not ours”: the work of derivation in women’s writing, 1560–c.1664.” In collaboration with Sarah C. E. Ross, he is co-editor of the poetry section of the forthcoming Palgrave Encyclopaedia of Early Modern Women’s Writing. With Rosalind Smith, he has co-authored a chapter in Early Modern Women and Complaint: Gender, Form, Politics (2020) which considers the implications of digital resources for the traditional first-line index in relation to a forthcoming database of early modern women’s complaint poetry. He works a researcher on the ARC funded project “Marginalia and the Early Modern Woman Writer,” and before that in the ARC-Marsden Grant funded project, “‘Woe is me:’ women and complaint in the English Renaissance.”

Jake Arthur

Jake Arthur

Jake Arthur is a DPhil candidate and Clarendon Scholar at Oxford University. His thesis examines early modern women’s work in translation and paraphrase and seeks to reclaim the expressive and intellectual possibilities of “derivative” works. The preliminary title of the thesis is “‘The stuffe not ours”: the work of derivation in women’s writing, 1560–c.1664.” In collaboration with Sarah C. E. Ross, he is co-editor of the poetry section of the forthcoming Palgrave Encyclopaedia of Early Modern Women’s Writing. With Rosalind Smith, he has co-authored a chapter in Early Modern Women and Complaint: Gender, Form, Politics (2020) which considers the implications of digital resources for the traditional first-line index in relation to a forthcoming database of early modern women’s complaint poetry. He works a researcher on the ARC funded project “Marginalia and the Early Modern Woman Writer,” and before that in the ARC-Marsden Grant funded project, “‘Woe is me:’ women and complaint in the English Renaissance.”

Hannah Upton

Hannah Upton

Jake Arthur is a DPhil candidate and Clarendon Scholar at Oxford University. His thesis examines early modern women’s work in translation and paraphrase and seeks to reclaim the expressive and intellectual possibilities of “derivative” works. The preliminary title of the thesis is “‘The stuffe not ours”: the work of derivation in women’s writing, 1560–c.1664.” In collaboration with Sarah C. E. Ross, he is co-editor of the poetry section of the forthcoming Palgrave Encyclopaedia of Early Modern Women’s Writing. With Rosalind Smith, he has co-authored a chapter in Early Modern Women and Complaint: Gender, Form, Politics (2020) which considers the implications of digital resources for the traditional first-line index in relation to a forthcoming database of early modern women’s complaint poetry. He works a researcher on the ARC funded project “Marginalia and the Early Modern Woman Writer,” and before that in the ARC-Marsden Grant funded project, “‘Woe is me:’ women and complaint in the English Renaissance.”

Partner institutions

Folger Shakespeare Library, University of Oxford. [LOGOS]

[Hidden – Future Link to Marginalia Database/interface]

ARC logo  FT180100371 Marginalia and the Early Modern Woman Writer, 1530-1660